A Moment Of Self Reflection

Sketch by Marc Mercado

By Marc Mercado

I remember when I switched my studies from concrete industry management (CIM) to interior architecture my freshman year. Even the architecture advisor questioned why I wanted to switch programs considering how successful CIM is.

That was the reason why I chose CIM for my academic career at Chico State. At that point in my life, I was driven by the expectations others set for me, with hopes of leaping over the poverty line. It only took the introductory course to push myself to look into other avenues– if this was going to be my full-time career I needed something more;

I was on a line: “to be a concrete man, or to know that I can [succeed without sacrificing]”.

With a minor in theatre arts, I looked forward to pursuing a program that included media arts. I came across the Media, Art, Design and Technology department, researched the major advisors, and I got in touch with Jennifer Meadows.

I hoped that she would be able to tell that I was lost and this was where I belonged, but my path continued to change and after that meeting, I kept looking. I was honestly intimidated by something new.

I thought, “if I’m worried about learning new skills/software in this academic path, then why not look for something that already encompasses my own skills and knowledge?”

Then I found interior architecture, so I figured, I know how to draw, I love design, and this will also satisfy two important areas of my life: family expectations and financial goals. There was much to love about this major, and to this day, I look back and wonder what life would have been like.

  Int. Architecture sketches by Marc

Fall was turning into winter. I was burning up and freezing at the same time; during this time my mental health was declining so during break, I flew to Mexico. Being outside of the country where I studied and worked felt incredibly liberating, I was surrounded by the beautiful Michoacán coast, the most blue skies and the greenest plants. This place is a sanctuary to me, it’s where I spent most of my childhood.

Playa Chuquiapan by Marc Mercado

A month turned into one more night and then I was in the sky, flying back “home”. There was still a lot of healing to be done, I hadn’t spent time thinking about the things I was still dealing with, but at least had a new academic plan.

It’s Junior Year, the first semester is a breeze, I joined AIGA (American Institute of Graphic Arts) and felt comfort knowing I was part of a design community. I forgot to mention that every time I went to academic advising for my major changes, I had to do all the “figuring it out” and show up with a plan. The absolute best advice I got was from a friend, Luciana, who encouraged me to pursue this graphic design path.

The second semester was unexpected. My confidence level in this new program was low, but I knew I was still learning. I felt like I wasn’t doing enough “graphic design” and was still figuring out how I could find passion in this form of art and design. During this semester there were many new professors in the department and talks about how some would say “ you should’ve learned X in Jane Doe’s class”. The unveiling of Chico State’s rebrand happened during the same time students in our program were being told they wouldn’t be able to graduate on time due to class shortages and the entirety of at least two classes emailed the department with concerns about a discourteous professor.

With all this going on, I wasn’t sure of my place here at Chico State. The more I fell in love with graphic design, and learned about how to use it to communicate, to express and to create art, the more I saw how unimportant I was to my university. I turned my cheek and saw the Academy of Arts in San Francisco. Immediately, I began planning; I reached out and began the application process.

I was on the phone with Chico State but they kept me on hold. The Academy was ringing but the minutes were too expensive. I felt like I needed better guidance, I needed professors that cared, a campus that recognized my passion. I was going to end up paying more out of pocket than I ever did at Chico and could tell that my ambition was too much for my family, for our bank accounts. It was only going to be an online program anyway.

A letter was sent to my address, from the Academy. I got in, it all came down to the story I wanted to tell:

Work with what I’m given and persevere? Or succumb to a for-profit school and find myself in a worse financial situation?

Clearly, I chose the former option. It’s like this mantra I heard some years back about how a good artist can work under any circumstance.

Projects done by Marc Mercado
Projects done by Marc Mercado
Projects done by Marc Mercado
Projects done by Marc Mercado

The Best Steps To Take When You Get A New Client

First Client In Public Relations? Follow These Steps

By Dylan Griffith

So you are just starting a career in Public Relations and were assigned your first client. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time. However, there are a few things you can do to kickstart your client relationship.  

  1. Research 

Always start by looking into your client and their company. Before figuring out what your job will be it is essential to take a closer look at who you will be working for. Researching the company’s goals and objectives to see what they do will help guide the work you do. It is also important to figure out who their audience is so you understand the people you are trying to communicate with. 

  1. Create an Organizational System 

Staying organized is one of the most important things you have to do when working with a client. Remembering meetings and deadlines are crucial. I recommend having multiple tactics for the organization which may include a written planner and a reminder app for your cellphone. Always have a calendar on all your electronic platforms so you can check it at any time. These tools can help you stay on top of upcoming deadlines and ensure all your work will be done in a timely manner. No client wants something completed late. 

  1. Make a PR Plan 

After meeting with your client for the first time, create measurable goals for where you want to be when the job is over. In doing this you can go and look during the middle of the job to make sure you are on the right track to complete the goals you set. If you are not on track then this lets you see what has been working so far and what hasn’t. 

  1. First Meeting 

Your first client meeting is when the client will have a chance to get to know you and your team, so first impressions are everything. Come prepared with your own questions so you are clear on what your goal is. Express what you have learned in your research on the company before the meetings and come up with early examples of how you think they could improve. Go at this respectfully. You might say something like, “I see you are doing this currently but, I think if you tried this tactic as well you will see better results.” This shows you are not being rude but trying to help them from the start. 

  1. Be Yourself 

The Public Relations world is a fun and exciting environment. Always be very professional, but do not be afraid to be yourself. This industry thrives on people being creative and trendsetting. 

“No one likes public relations robots. Always try to be creative”

-Dylan Griffith 

  1. Portfolio 

Throughout your time working with the company, keep track of all the work you create for them. It helps to send reports and updates to your client. Share everything you have created so they never question if you are doing enough. Also, help build a portfolio to show others the work you have created in the past. 

  1. Finally

I know all this information may seem like a lot at first but over time it will become like second nature. All these steps will help you grow your career from these simple steps.

Perfecting Your LinkedIn Profile

Perfecting Your LinkedIn Profile

By Eve Miller

Your LinkedIn profile will likely be the first place recruiters look when you apply for a job. They’ll be asking themselves things such as, “Is this person active on LinkedIn?” “Are they showing interest in news about their career and field?” Recruiters and hiring managers are trying to find things you normally wouldn’t learn with just a resume.

With this in mind, it’s essential to stay up to date with your LinkedIn and start one as soon as possible if you haven’t already. It can be daunting to figure out what to do with your profile as there are a variety of different features, and everyone’s page seems to look different. Instead of spending hours mindlessly searching for what you want, follow these five simple steps and get ahead on job searching.

  1. Have A Good Headshot

Learn how to take a good headshot. While it may not seem like a big thing, headshots can help you stand out among some of the competition. Looking professional gives you the upper hand and lets your future employer know you take yourself and your career seriously. 

It doesn’t have to be a big production with lights and a fancy camera.  Just putting on a nice shirt and having a friend help you take a photo in front of a neutral background can make the difference between the ominous blank gray circle and a nice friendly headshot.

  1. Look For Connections

Sync your contacts. Just do it. Even those people from high school that you never spoke a word to outside of a group presentation can get a connection request. Most people who at least know your name are willing to connect and as that number of connections goes up, so will your job search network.

LinkedIn’s goal is to show that you are always three people away from knowing everyone. Utilize your first connections to make more with second or third connections. This is a great way to network and is almost as effortless as scrolling through your phone on social media. You’ll be able to see how many alumni, friends and other connections you know that work at the companies where you want to apply. 

“You never know who may be the ‘in’ to getting you your future job.”

-Eve Miller

  1. Gain Badges And Skills

It’s time-consuming, it’s painful, but it’s useful. The skills tests LinkedIn offers are an amazing way to start building your LinkedIn profile and demonstrating you are kick starting your career. The quizzes take anywhere from 5 to 20 minutes and even allow you to narrow down your job search because it gives you more accurate suggestions based on the skill tests you’ve taken.

  1. Engage With Others

Just like we tell our clients, you must be active on social media. Engaging with your following by liking, commenting and reposting shows that you aren’t on LinkedIn just to find jobs. Engaging is a great way to participate in your industry more generally. You want your future employer to know that you care about the people you connect with and follow. This shows that you’re invested in your career and aren’t just in it for the money, but that you genuinely enjoy what you do.

  1. Cold Messaging 

Cold messaging is tedious and something that is debated. The truth is, it works 50% of the time. Cold messaging job recruiters or even people within your field who have your dream job is not only a smart way to gain connections but also helps you find out more about your career.

Asking questions about how others landed their current job, or even asking why they got into the career, helps you better understand the field you’re entering. If you’re lucky, it can end in an interview for a job. It’s not guaranteed that a cold message  will lead to an interview, but it’s a step in the right direction as you connect with more people and apply for jobs.

LinkedIn doesn’t have to be as scary as logging into Facebook for the first time. It can be simple, easy and helpful for networking and learning more about your career. These five simple tips take no longer than twenty minutes a day and can make your profile look like you are already a professional.
Remember, connect with everyone you may come into contact with, it could create opportunities that didn’t exist before. That being said, connect with me on LinkedIn. 🙂

Let’s Talk Professional Communication!

Up Your Email Game Today!

By Skylar Trostinsky

If you’ve ever met me in person, you know I have quite the personality. It’s much easier for me (and many other professionals) to talk with someone face-to-face. This way we can effectively spread information, view body language, and make connections! Alas, this now virtual world has been inundated with digital communication and that means we must learn how to be professional in person and through text, too. 

Communicating with an agency, client or representative can be a daunting task. Do you keep it dim and straight to the point? Or do you add a bit of flare and personality? I mean, you want to express who you are, especially when you work in public relations, right? With a semester of email chains, project delegation and more under my belt, I have learned a few tips and tricks for communicating online. 

  1. Set Goals for Emails 

Staying organized is key to receiving useful documents and information. Before typing emails to agencies, clients or coworkers it’s important to set goals within the communication chain. That person is just as busy as you, so do them and yourself a favor by creating an outline of who you are writing to, what you need from the recipient and what you want them to respond with.

  1. Use Your Subject Line!

When considering the workload your recipient may be dealing with, it’s imperative to use brief, catchy subjects that include keywords. With this, your reader will know exactly what to expect when clicking on your email or maybe even be tempted to respond. 

  1. Be Clear and Concise 

Avoid using an excessive amount of words in emails, especially when providing instructions. Separate thoughts, questions and suggestions with paragraph breaks, bullet points, etc. to highlight information. This also allows recipients to quickly skim through text and find their to-do’s! 

Utilize appropriate punctuation and refrain from using ALL CAPS. Although it’s OK to bold and capitalize some notes, you never want the addressee to feel like you are shouting at them. 

  1. Be Polite and Be Yourself 

Here comes the question of whether personality is necessary, or appropriate, in an email chain. Although clarity and conciseness are imperative aspects to communication, you should never hide your character from anyone! It’s just critical that you remain professional and consistent with a soft, inviting tone. Check out READCITY’s “5 Clever Ways To Give Your Business Emails Personality” for more tips.

  1. Proofread, Proofread, Proofread!

As a PR professional, one of the worst things you can do when communicating with other experts is to send emails without reading them over. Typos may send negative messages about you or your organization and generally come off as unprofessional. 

A way to make sure your emails are grammatically correct and have been spell checked is by writing them in a separate document first. Doing this has helped me draft numerous messages, with different formats to ultimately choose which version will best convey my points. 

“Although clarity and conciseness are imperative aspects to communication, you should never hide your character from anyone! It’s just critical that you remain professional and consistent with a soft, inviting tone.”

-Skylar Trostinsky

Professional communication doesn’t end in email chains! Further your credibility, express yourself and improve relationships by taking skills such as goal setting, clarity and politeness to group and one-on-one meetings. Email away!

Resources: 

Tips For Professional Emails

Effective Email Communication In The Workplace

Tips To Help You Stay Organized

Pen and notebook

By Madison Starboin

Staying organized is very important, especially in the world of public relations.

As a college student I am balancing so many responsibilities, so for me staying organized is not only a priority, but it is how I survive my crazy schedule. 

I work 16-18 hours per week, I have four classes, and I have an internship that requires about 10-12 hours per week of meetings and work. If it wasn’t for staying organized and using my first 3 years of college to find a system that works for me. 

Here are a few tips I’ve learned about staying organized and finding the right system for you.

The first and most obvious thing is to try different time-management systems to see what works best for you. There are a variety of different ways to keep track of your schedule and tasks. This is important because the older you get the busier your schedule is and the more vital it is for you to be organized. Some people use paper calendars or planners to keep track of events and assignments. For me, I have found that online methods work better for me because I can set reminders and check the schedule without carrying around a bulky calendar.

Remember, this is trial and error, so if something does not work, there are always other methods.

The internet is an amazing tool for finding out how people stay organized.

Another tip that I have is if your work, school, or internship requires you to use a tool or recommends a certain tool, try it out. Even if you don’t like it or aren’t required to use it, it is free so it is worth a shot to see if it works for you. For example, my internship uses basecamp which I love for having a central place to post and access documents.

This tip only works if you like using online tools to stay organized, but I highly recommend using Google. Google a ton of free tools to help you stay organized and you are easily able to access them from anywhere. I use google calendar for organizing my schedule. I set reminders, add events, and keep track of tasks. I can even put color codes and have the app send me a reminder 30 minutes before the event. It is also easy to delete or repeat events. The best thing of all is that it is completely free and there is no subscription fee to be able to use most of their products. 

Within the Google Suite, I absolutely love using Google Keep. For those of you who don’t know what Google Keep is, it is virtual sticky notes and lists. I use this for my class assignments and tasks for TGC. I color code them and make checklists. This way I can see all the things I need to do for all my classes and internships in one organized place.

The last tip that I have is to keep a communication log. This is something I learned at work. I work in the Whitney hall mailroom and communicating with people after your shift is key. We use an online excel sheet to make notes about packages or anything that may happen on another shift. I have found that this is helpful when people work at different times, so it may not be something that works for your environment

I hope that these tips have inspired you to stay organized or at least gave you ideas on how to spice up how you organize your life!

5 Tips To Help Manage Anxiety In College: From A PR Student

Pink sunset clouds.

By Jessica Delgado

College students deal with so much during the four years they are in college. Some students take on financial independence, life obstacles, challenging circumstances, and toxic relationships throughout their college years. 

Anxiety can take over your entire day, running plans and obligations you made prior to being triggered. Most college students don’t know they are experiencing anxiety because they know little about it or how to handle it. 

In public relations, the amount of work and time you have to dedicate to strategy briefs, meetings, reports and collaborative work can be very overwhelming. 

Although I am not a licensed doctor and have no degree in psychology, I am a college student, and here are some of my self-help tricks to help with anxiety.

1. Allow yourself to take a step back  

I have experienced the saying, “I bite off more than I can chew,” when it comes to workload. I never want to miss any opportunity for growth in my school and personal life. But there really isn’t enough time in a day to do everything. I know we have all been in a position where we sit down to work on tasks and become completely overwhelmed with what is required from us. I have learned over the years that your mind cannot remember everything. Writing down tasks and their due date can help prevent you from missing deadlines. Planners are a helpful tool in organizing when a task is due. Staying organized with a planner allows you to meet deadlines, takes the stress of forgetting away, and helps prevent getting overloaded with things to remember. 

2. Be in the environment where you feel the safest 

I have always considered “my space” to be the safest. Sometimes if you are in an environment where there are a ton of people or in an unknown area, it can be overwhelming for your mind. Loud noises and chaos can spike one’s heart rate. Being able to go to “your space” to decompress can really help with lowering your anxiety. Whether your space is the TGC office, library, bedroom, kitchen, living room, or car – find a space where you feel comfortable and safe! 

3. Free write your emotions 

Before I found comfort in opening up to people I trusted, I found a lot of comfort in writing down what I feel. Sometimes, we don’t feel comfortable opening up to others, and that is completely okay! Once you begin writing, it can feel like a weight is being lifted off of you. Find something that releases negative emotions and feelings that benefits your mind, whether it is free writing or taking a walk outside. Our minds are very powerful and creative in thoughts. Find something that works for you! 

"You are stronger than what is making you anxious." -Jessica Delgado

4. Talk to a friend or loved one

Find comfort in a friend or loved one when you are experiencing anxiety. I know not everyone feels comfortable or has someone they can go to when they are experiencing anxiety. However, opening up and letting someone know what is going on with you can help. Taking a break to laugh and talk about things like what’s going on with the Kardashians, reality TV, or sports can really help your mind not be in “work mode.”  

5. Leaning on your peers in class 

I know here at TGC, everyone is willing to pick up the slack if help is needed. Having open communication about needing help on a brief or creative project you are working on can help you and your team. Everyone has good and bad days. Relying on your team and letting them know you need to be “saved” can prevent missed deadlines and upset clients. 

Managing anxiety is achievable. Take it day by day by finding what helps you in conquering it! You are loved and you are strong! 

3 Things I Learned From Tehama Group Communications

By Benjamin Goldberg

Stepping into an internship that I knew almost nothing about, I took it upon myself to become acclimated with the environment and learn the essentials of becoming a professional Account Executive. At first, it felt as if the stress never ended and the feeling of being uncomfortable in a new setting kept growing. As cliche as it sounds, I was able to slow time down, gather all of my thoughts and emotions, and put everything that I was taught to the test. 

Here are three things I learned from TGC:

Time Management

Heading into my second semester of junior year, soon after being awarded dean’s list for the year prior, I thought I understood everything that needed to be done in order to stay on task. TGC quickly made me realize that the tools under my belt needed some improvement. Weekly tasks including team and client agendas, slide decks, timesheets, reports, and team member evaluations are just the base of what needs to be completed. As an Account Executive, you take on the role of the middleman between your team and your client, which also means constant communication, delegation of tasks, and running professional meetings. To stay on top of all of this, TGC has taught me to prioritize tasks based on timeliness and importance to the client. Once I began to prioritize my assignments and tasks as such, the light at the end of the tunnel began to shine brighter. The work I was producing was more thorough and to the best of my ability, making for a more confident self and client. 

Etiquette

Being from sunny Southern California, I never dressed in anything but shorts and a t-shirt, unless for special occasions. Even in my first couple years of college, with GE classes and online school taking up most of my time during the pandemic, there wasn’t a need to dress up. TGC has helped me realize that dressing for success actually helps one feel more confident, present, and attentive. Not only does it allow me to feel this way, but it also allows for the quality and presentation of my work to be more effective and professional. 

Teamwork

Without my team(s), there is no telling where I would be at this point in the semester. As an Account Executive, the sense of feeling that everything you touch is your responsibility creeps up on you quite often. Stress and anxiety levels run high, resulting in a poor quality of work. It is important to remember that your team members are there to help you relieve that feeling. TGC has implemented the standard of “don’t be afraid to ask for help.” Getting help is nothing to be ashamed of, but something to be proud of. It shows that you care about what you do, that you want to get better at it, and in the end, be able to help someone else who was in your shoes at one point. 

As my time at TGC comes to an end, I take it upon myself to reflect on the experiences I had and the lessons I have learned. Not only will these lessons serve me throughout the rest of my college career at Chico State University, but  also travel with me throughout my career post-grad . Everyone has to start somewhere, and to be frank, TGC was the best place to start. 

How to Utilize Your Campus Resources

4 tips on how taking advantage of campus resources can accelerate your education

By Hannah Sarwar

Many college students overlook the importance of campus resources while they are available to them. Hundreds of helping hands that are tailored to benefiting students are right at their fingertips. Resources are there to help, and are designed specifically to make their lives easier. This blog will dive into four tips on how utilizing campus resources can accelerate an educational career as a college student. 

1. Exploring Academic Resources 

The possibilities are endless when it comes to the aid of academic resources on campus. From help ranging anywhere from skills workshops to writing centers, there is guaranteed to be a program that directly meets a student’s needs. More often than not, undergraduate school can feel overwhelming, especially with ongoing pressure of transitioning from online to in-person classes after the COVID-19 pandemic. Taking advantage of academic resources is something that can help ease the madness of getting a degree. For example, taking ten minutes out of your day to explore academic resources is a benefit that may surprise you in a good way! 

2. Take Advantage of Advising 

Many of us know the dreaded word “advising” from lugging our backpacks to our high school advisor while looking over future classes. Well guess what, college advising is not only different, but it is extremely helpful. Discussing future goals and pathways can be a large contributor to a student’s success. Whether it be academic, graduation, or even career advising, there is always someone on campus to help with personal needs. This can be extremely helpful for expected graduates to work on resumes and cover letters for future employers. Having a professional set of eyes on your resume is an advantage that will put a student ahead of their competition. 

3. Exploring Mental Health Services 

Self-care can often get overlooked by college students. Between the stress of passing classes, maintaining a social life, and allocating time for yourself, it can become intense. One way to combat this in order to find a balance between academics and personal life is to explore mental health resources that may be available on campus. Many schools acknowledge that students are stressed, and provide various resources that allow them to de-stress or even just talk about it. Some resources that are available on many campuses include free counseling, confidential support services, medical care services, de-stress centers and much more! With a tough transition back to campuses after the pandemic, many campuses are also offering virtual resources that students can access online. Self-care is an extremely important asset to take time for early on in life, especially when there are many resources that can help.

College can be overwhelming. Seeking help and taking advantage of the on campus resources that are available to students is a great way to combat stress and further prepare oneself for the real world.

– Hannah Sarwar

4. Attend Study Workshops

More often than not, various campuses will arrange study groups throughout the year for students in different majors to attend. This not only allows students to be exposed to various academic mindsets, but it allows them to connect with peers while getting adequate help in a subject they may be falling behind in. Study groups allow for student interaction while also helping improve academic performance. Looking into a calendar of upcoming study groups your school is hosting is a great way to kickstart a student’s performance in classes they may be feeling stressed in. 

College can be overwhelming. Seeking help and taking advantage of the on campus resources that are available to students is a great way to combat stress and further prepare oneself for the real world. For whatever reason, many students do not realize the impact that utilizing your resources can have on your academic career. By taking one step ahead and exploring what schools have to offer, one may be surprised with just how many resources they can find!

How to Tackle Unfamiliar Topics

By Victoria Hernández

In the world of Public Relations clients range from standard practices to niche fields such as government relations. Every business, organization, and public figure partake in PR one way or another. Take advantage of the flourishing field and find a career uniquely suited for your interests.

When working at an agency or job hunting, there may be clients in an uncommon industry. When you find yourself in a situation such as this, take a step back and assess the situation. The following features a guide of what to do when interacting with unfamiliar topics:

Gather what you know

Even if your prior knowledge is extremely limited, it is important to write down any and all information you do know about the topic. By doing this you’re able to get your brain thinking about the matter, while also creating basic points of reference for future information to latch onto.

Take advantage of Google

Although some resources may be unreliable, your primary search engine is a staple when attempting to acquire basic knowledge. Take a look at an online encyclopedia, articles, or industry news sites. By reading a bit about the topic, you are able to become familiar with industry terms and verbiage along with origin points. When obtaining base knowledge, Google can become your best friend.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions

It is acceptable to admit that you don’t know something. Nobody knows everything about everything. It is important to put your ego aside and talk to someone knowledgeable about the topic. Asking an individual questions can create a better learning response for your brain. When actively engaging in a conversation with an individual you are more likely to absorb information and actually understand it. 

Fact-check before publishing

If you are unsure about a fact, make sure to obtain various sources conveying the same information. At times it can be confusing to know whether something is accurate when you do not know much about the topic to begin with.

All in all, it is important to show interest and motivation to learn. Don’t stress yourself out too much in attempting to learn everything about a specific industry. As you grow within your field, you will gain new experiences and knowledge as time passes.

You’re Graduating! Here Are A Few Tips To Kickstart Your PR Career

By Alexis Harvey

Congratulations! You’re graduating! You have the whole world ahead of you! But you are stressed! 

The months leading up to graduation are some of the most exciting times of your life, but they can seem daunting at the same time. After all of the excitement settles down, reality sets in, and you have some decision-making to do. Where do you go from here?

It can be difficult to choose what type of PR you want to pursue or where you want to go after graduation. Here are a few ways to make these next couple of months leading up to graduation smooth and headache-free: 

Finding your niche

The best thing about PR is that it is such a diverse industry. One of the most difficult decisions public relations students face is deciding what type of PR best suits their abilities. You should think about your personal interests and unique experiences to find your niche.

A niche is a combination of your professional skills, interests, and fields you want to work in. It can be a whole department of the industry or even a specialty, such as content creation in the realm of digital media. 

Begin by asking yourself a couple of questions: 

What are my greatest strengths? Weaknesses?

What do I love to do?

What do my peers say I am best at in the world of PR?

Some PR specialists thrive in content creation while others may excel in writing. It is important to immerse yourself in all departments of public relations during your time in college to better understand your strengths in the industry. 

Deciding what area of PR interests you the most

Along with finding your niche, it is also important to tap into your personal interests to figure out what area of PR you want to work in. As an intern or in an entry-level position it is important to take this time to expose yourself to all aspects of the industry to figure out what areas of focus you enjoy working on. 

You may consider entertainment PR if you have an interest in working in the world of television, fashion, music, or celebrity culture. Your role would be to represent and promote those within the entertainment world. 

Maybe you have an interest in healthcare but don’t want to become a healthcare provider. Healthcare PR would be a great match for you! Healthcare PR reps work with various health organizations, non-profits, pharmaceutical companies, and hospitals. They act as liaisons between these organizations and the mainstream media. 

Technology PR is also a great position for those who enjoy keeping up with the newest technological advancements and gadgets. 

There are an array of PR jobs in different industries so it is important to find the one that is best suited to you.

Remember to keep going and not feel discouraged

This is probably the best advice anyone can receive after graduating from college. Yes, change is quite difficult, especially when it comes to graduating, leaving the place you have called home for the last four years, and deciding what to do next.

After finding your niche and area of expertise it is time to start applying to different jobs in different cities. It can be overwhelming in the beginning but it is important to remember to not feel discouraged. We all know how anxiety-inducing it can be to begin the interview process but it is also such an exciting time. You want to take this time to truly understand what you want out of a career and just because one company turned you down, your dream job may be right around the corner.

As a PR professional you have so many different options, but that is also the beauty of public relations. Being so new to the industry it is the perfect time to try new things. Remember that no matter what path you choose to take, all experience is a valuable experience, so don’t be afraid to begin your journey in public relations.